Volkswagen Golf: Through the Ages

Volkswagen Golf: Through the Ages

The Volkswagen Service Team at Volks Affair takes a look at one of the most popular models of Volkswagen – the Golf.

1970s – The Volkswagen Golf is Born

Even the Pope owned a Golf – this was Volkswagen’s replacement for the Beetle. The Golf was the new generation of ‘people’s car’. It was meant as a classless, affordable car for everybody. And that’s what it became. Its popularity took off and Volkswagen again proved to know what people were looking for in a car. The small rectangular hatchback – Mark 1 model – was just the right combination of fun, affordability and utilitarianism. In 1976 they launched the GTI edition and a convertible version for those who could afford to spend a little bit extra.

VW Golf Mark 1

1983 – Golf Mark 2 Hits the Market

This update saw the Volkswagen Golf get a little roomier. The look stayed similar – still rectangular but with some updated technology. By 1988 it had sold more than 10 million.

1991 – Golf Mark 3 Shape Shifts

Not so boxy anymore – Volkswagen gave this Model a rounder look and enhanced safety features. The 1990s were seeing a rise in car safety standards – the Golf introduced front airbags to its line and ABS become a standard feature by 1996. The Golf TDI or turbo diesel direct-injection Golf became popular and was the first compact car to have this feature.

1997 – Golf Mark 4 Makes a Slick Debut

Modern, up-to-date and still popular, the Golf 4 rounded their shape some more and future models still have this recognisable design.

2003 – Golf Mark 5 Modernised Further

Keeping its shape the Golf Mark 5 increased the cargo volume and slightly improved the size of the interior. Unfortunately, it faced criticism that the interior seemed cheap.

2008 – Golf Mark 6 Safety First

The Mark 6 improved safety technology and included 7 standard airbags. It received a 5-star safety rating from Euro NCAP. It also addressed the previous critiques of a cheap interior and improved the quality.

 VW Golf with rounder shape

2012 – Golf Mark 7 Proving the Volkswagen Brand Stands the Test of Time

Still popular and still going strong. Our Volkswagen Service Team at Volks Affair in Melbourne are keen to service all types of this popular people’s car. Give us a call and book your service today.

VW Mechanics: Tips for Buying a Used VW

Buying a used car can be challenging so our expert VW mechanics from Volks Affair in Melbourne have provided some good tips.

 

Step 1 – Research

Look into the year, make and model – all car manufacturers, including Volkswagen have less than stellar years. If you know the year, make and model then you can see if there have been any reported issues across the line. The issue may be easy to fix but being aware of any potential issues can help with price negotiation.

 

Look at the safety ratings for the car – these are based on real-life accidents. ANCAP Safety Ratings will give you an idea of the car safety rating when the car was new but check the Used Car ratings too.

 

If you are happy with the year, make and model – the next step is to check the vehicle’s history. Determine if it’s been in any accidents or had other issues that could lead to future problems.

 

Volks Affair suggests asking these questions when looking for a used VW:

  1. How many owners has the vehicle had?
  2. Is the vehicle currently registered?
  3. Is the car insured?
  4. What mileage does it get?
  5. Has it been involved in any crashes (major or minor)?

 Looking at a used VW - Mechanic gives tips

Step 2 – Pre-purchase Considerations

  • Road Worthiness certificate and Record of Regular Servicing

Ask for the paperwork – legitimate sellers will have this all-in order before listing the car.

 

  • Cleanliness of the interior

A cared for car will be clean and well looked after without any splits or tears in the upholstery

 

  • Condition of the body and paint

Faded paint will show exposure to the elements and indicate that the car has been parked outside for long periods. Look out for obvious bumps and scrapes in the body that may be costly to repair. Check for signs of rust and DIY repairs that may not be up to industry standard.

 

  • Inspect the Tyres

Check that the tyres have worn evenly – if they haven’t it could be a sign that the alignment is out. Don’t forget to check the condition of the spare.

 

Volks Affair

We are an independent service centre specialising in German Vehicles. If you own a VW don’t hesitate to give us a call and book a service with our top-rated VW mechanics.

Bye Bye Beetle

A red VW beetle in an alley

I guess you could say it’s the end of an era. Volkswagen has announced they will stop production of the iconic VW Beetle in 2019. 

 

I have great memories of roaring around town as a child in my mum’s VW Beetle. Roaring is certainly the right word to describe the loud rear-engine bug of a car. Any conversation had to be yelled over the noise of the engine coming in through our open windows. Hot summer days meant we’d stick to the leather seats and have to peel ourselves out of the car once we’d reached our destination. In fact, the seats were so low, my mum needed a cushion to see over the steering wheel. Those were the days!

 

Volkswagen’s Beetle: The Great ‘People’s Car’

 

The Beginning

The Beetle started its life in Germany in the 1930s – the vision, as commanded by Adolf Hitler, was to produce a cheap car that could be mass produced and sold to the German people. It was designed by Ferdinand Porsche (yes, the founder of the Porsche car company).

 

The outbreak of World War II saw the commercial production of the Beetle stopped – only 210 had been made. Through the war, a few variants were produced for the military elite, but an air raid damaged the factory and all production halted in 1944.

 

Mass Production Begins

Post-war the British took over the damaged factory. Instead of destroying it, a strategic thinking British Army Officer, Major Ivan Hirst, realised that the factory might benefit both the British and the war-torn Germans. There was a desperate need for jobs in Germany and the British Army needed vehicles. He got the factory running again and saw that the British Army approved the commission of 20 000 cars. This new outlet of cheap cars quickly led to the establishment of sales and export networks across Europe and by 1955 the one-millionth car rolled off the production line.

 

‘The Bug’ steals our hearts

As they say, the rest is history. The Beetle, affectionately known as ‘The Bug’, is a car that has many stories to tell. It helped Germany promote a more positive image after the war and it afforded many a student and young family a means of transport. Its enduring popularity and iconic status are a testimony to our fondness for this fun, little car. It will be missed but definitely not forgotten!

Close-up of a blue vw beetle's light

Fun Facts

  • The original Beetle stayed in production for 6 decades.
  • A jaw-dropping 21 529 464 Beetles have been produced
  • It’s the most-manufactured car of a single platform ever
  • It was voted the 4th most influential Car of the 20th Century in 1999

 

Volks Affair – German Car Service Specialists in Melbourne

The future of Volkswagen lies in electric cars and family cars. If you’re a VW owner, make sure your car is serviced by a reputable service centre. Volks Affair is an independent German Car Service Centre in Melbourne. We love keeping our customers’ cars in top condition. Give us a call today to book a service.

Volkswagen’s New Logo

Volkswagen’s New Logo

Volkswagen announced that they will be updating their logo next year. How it will change is a mystery: the company is remaining tight-lipped. What we know so far is that the badge will look “as good on a smartphone as it does on a car”.

Volkswagen are focusing more on electric vehicles — the brand want to have an electric version of their entire fleet by 2030. We imagine that the new logo is being designed to reflect VW’s electric future. (more…)